Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Juan D.
dc.contributor.authorRiera, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez, Ricardo A.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Moreno, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Palacios, José María 
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T12:21:15Z
dc.date.available2019-10-09T12:21:15Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0376-8929
dc.identifier.urihttp://riull.ull.es/xmlui/handle/915/16374
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, islands have been used as ecological and biogeographical models because of their assumed ecological simplicity, reduced ecosystem size and isolation. The vast number of Earth’s oceanic islands play a key role in maintaining global biodiversity and serve as a rich source of evolutionary novelty. Research into the factors determining diversity patterns on islands must disentangle natural phenomena from anthropogenic causes of habitat transformation, interruption and enhancement of biological fluxes and species losses and gains in these geographically and ecologically limited environments. The anthropogenic ecological forcing of communication through global transport has profound implications regarding island– continent links. Anthropogenic disturbances along continental margins and insular coasts contribute to shaping island biotas in ecological time, but also have evolutionary consequences of global resonance. Patterns of human landscape and resource use (geographical space and ecological communities and species), as well as increasing ecological connectivity of oceanic islands and mainland, are chief driving forces in island biogeography that should be reappraised. Global indirect effects of human activities (i.e. climate change) may also affect islands and interact with these processes. We review the implications of direct and indirect anthropogenic disturbances on island biotic patterns, focusing on island size, isolation and introduced exotic species, as well as the unsettled issue of oceanic island ecological vulnerability.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherCambridge University Presses_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnvironmental Conservation;2017
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleA reappraisal of the role of humans in the biotic disturbance of islandses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0376892917000236
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesses_ES
dc.subject.keywordIsland disturbancees_ES
dc.subject.keywordAlien specieses_ES
dc.subject.keywordIsland diversity patternses_ES
dc.subject.keywordEspecies exóticases_ES
dc.subject.keywordPatrones de diversidad de islases_ES
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional