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dc.contributor.authorGarcía del Rey, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorNanos, Nikos
dc.contributor.authorLópez de Heredia, Unai
dc.contributor.authorGil Muñoz, Pascual
dc.contributor.authorOtto, Rüdiger
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Palacios, José María 
dc.contributor.authorGil, Luis
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-10T13:40:03Z
dc.date.available2019-10-10T13:40:03Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1612-4642
dc.identifier.urihttp://riull.ull.es/xmlui/handle/915/16446
dc.description.abstractA major goal of avian ecological research is to determine how distribution and abundance of preferred resources available influence population dynamics and contribute to understand life-history characteristics. Food is widely considered the ultimate factor influencing these traits. We studied, with seed traps, the spatiotemporal variability of Pinus canariensis seed rain during 2007–2008, as a means to explain why a post-dispersal seed predator of conservation concern, the endemic blue chaffinch Fringilla teydea, can adjust its annual life cycle with this variation in an insular environment. Generalized linear mixed models and geostatistical tools were used. Results highlight that temperature and relative humidity are important predictors of seed release rates. Additionally, a high temporal variation was detected in seed abundance (i.e., peaks of massive seed release during the summer months, intermediate values in the autumn, and minimum release rates in winter and spring). Finally, withinstand spatial variation in seed flux was surprisingly large with the most productive microsites receiving three to four times more seeds than the least productive ones. Pine seeds showed a high protein value and a low germination rate. Based on these findings, we suggest that the fortunes of the blue chaffinch should be intimately related to spatiotemporal annual P. canariensis seed crops, temperature acting as a proximate cue, and food availability as the ultimate factor. For the endangered blue chaffinch population on Gran Canaria, we recommend, until more data are available, improving the seed supply during the winter season, either artificially (feeders) or naturally (planting Myrica faya shrubs).es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEuropean Journal of Wildlife Research;57, 2011
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleSpatiotemporal variation of a Pinus seed rain available for an endemic finch in an insular environmentes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10344-010-0438-1
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesses_ES
dc.subject.keywordSeed trapes_ES
dc.subject.keywordSeed raines_ES
dc.subject.keywordConservation implicationses_ES
dc.subject.keywordLluvia de semillases_ES
dc.subject.keywordImplicaciones de conservaciónes_ES
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


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