Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOtto, Rüdiger
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorGaisberg, Markus von
dc.contributor.authorStierstorfer, Christian
dc.contributor.authorNaranjo-Cigala, Agustín
dc.contributor.authorSteinbauer, Manuel J.
dc.contributor.authorBorregaard, Michael K.
dc.contributor.authorArévalo, José Ramón 
dc.contributor.authorGarzón Machado, Víctor
dc.contributor.authorArco Aguilar, Marcelino José del 
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Palacios, José María 
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-29T18:25:47Z
dc.date.available2019-10-29T18:25:47Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://riull.ull.es/xmlui/handle/915/16997
dc.description.abstractAim The general dynamic model (GDM) of oceanic island biogeography integrates rates of immigration, speciation and extinction in relation to a humped trajectory of island area, species carrying capacity and topographic complexity through time, based on a simplified island ontogeny. In practice, many islands have more complex ontogenies, featuring surfaces of varying age. Here, we extend the GDM to apply at a local scale within islands, and test the predictions analytically within individual islands. Location El Hierro, La Palma and Tenerife (Canary Islands). Methods Following the GDM logic, we derive predictions for the distributions and richness of single island endemics (SIEs) across island landscapes of different age. We test these predictions by means of generalized linear models and binominal tests using gridded species occurrence data for vascular plant SIE species and a set of climatic, topographic and terrain age variables. We also examined phylogenetic divergence times for a subset of endemic lineages. Results Geological age, in interaction with slope, and topographic variables, best explained SIE richness at the landscape scale. About 70% of SIEs had ranges strongly biased to, or largely restricted to old terrain. Available phylogenetic divergence times of SIEs of radiated plant lineages suggested an origin on the older parts of the islands. Metrics of anthropogenic disturbance and habitat availability were unrelated to the observed SIE pattern. Main conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that SIEs have evolved and accumulated on older and topographically complex terrain, while colonization processes predominate on the youngest parts. These results imply that evolutionary processes shape species distributions at the landscape scale within islands. This opens the perspective of extending the GDM framework to understand processes at a local scale within individual islands.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Biogeography;
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleTransferring and implementing the general dynamic model of oceanic island biogeography at the scale of island fragments: the roles of geological age and topography in plant diversification in the Canarieses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jbi.12684
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subject.keywordCanary islandses_ES
dc.subject.keywordEndemic plantses_ES
dc.subject.keywordEnvironmental heterogeneityes_ES
dc.subject.keywordGeneral dynamic modeles_ES
dc.subject.keywordIsland biogeographyes_ES
dc.subject.keywordIsland evolutiones_ES
dc.subject.keywordLandscape diversityes_ES
dc.subject.keywordOceanic islandses_ES
dc.subject.keywordSpatial autocorrelationes_ES
dc.subject.keywordSpecies richness patternses_ES
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersiones_ES


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional